Media History Seminar Programme 2016-17

Here’s the provisional schedule for this year’s Media History Seminar jointly run by the Institute of English Studies and Institute of Historical Research. The seminars will take place at Senate House on designated Tuesdays starting at 6pm. Everyone is welcome.

“Media History” Programme 2016-17:

Session 1 (18 October 2016):

Prof. Steve Connor (Cambridge)

“Psychotechnographies: Why All Machines Are Writing Machines”

Senate House Room 104

Session 2 (8 November 2016):

Dr Amanda Wrigley (Westminster)

Dr John Wyver (Westminster)

Senate House Room 243

Session 3 (24 January 2017):

Prof. Jane Chapman (Lincoln)

“Double the Work, but Double the Scope? Comparative International Research into 19th-Century Periodicals and the First World War”

Senate House Room 243

Session 4 (28 February 2017):

Prof. Marianne van Remoortel (Ghent)

Respondent: Dr Birgit Van Puymbroeck (Ghent)

Senate House Room 243

Session 5 (16 May 2017):

Dr Simon Rowberry (Stirling)

Dr Verity Hunt (Southampton)

Senate House Room G34 (Gordon Room)

The schedule will be updated and additional information provided about the talks in due course. In the meantime, please save the dates.

This seminar is generously supported by the Media History journal, Queen Mary University of London’s English Department, the Institute of English Studies, and the Institute of Historical Research.

Video of “Alice in Cableland” Seminar

A video of the “Alice in Cableland” seminar is now available for anyone who was unable to attend. The team running the AHRC-funded project “Scrambled Messages: The Telegraphic Imaginary 1857-1900” discusses the issues involved in coding, cabling and communications technologies through the medium of John Tenniel’s illustrations of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland.

The panel features Anne Chapman (PhD Candidate, KCL), Caroline Arscott (Professor of Art History, The Courtauld Institute of Art), Clare Pettitt (Professor of Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture, KCL), Natalie Hume (PhD Candidate, The Courtauld Institute of Art), and Cassie Newland (Postdoctoral Researcher, KCL).

You can find the video here or on YouTube.

Alice in Cableland

The Media History seminar & Nineteenth Century Studies seminar are pleased to be holding a special joint session titled “Alice in Cableland.” 2016 sees the 150th anniversaries of the successful laying of the Atlantic Cable and the publication of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland. The team on the AHRC-funded project “Scrambled Messages: The Telegraphic Imaginary 1857-1900” will be thinking about the issues involved in coding, cabling and communications technologies through the medium of John Tenniel’s  illustrations of Carroll’s classic.

The panel will include Anne Chapman (PhD Candidate, KCL), Caroline Arscott (Professor of Art History, The Courtauld Institute of Art), Clare Pettitt (Professor of Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture, KCL), Natalie Hume (PhD Candidate, The Courtauld Institute of Art), and Cassie Newland (Postdoctoral Researcher, KCL).

More info about the project can be found here: http://www.scrambledmessages.ac.uk/

The seminar will take place on Thursday May 12 at 6pm in the Senate House Court Room. All are welcome!

Further details about the seminar are available through the Institute of Historical Research (http://www.history.ac.uk/) and the Institute of English Studies (http://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/).

Media History Seminar with Sean Cubitt

Please join us at the next Media History seminar for Sean Cubitt’s talk ‘Implications of Colour: Commodity, Biopolitics and Environment’. The meeting will take place at 6pm on Thursday March 3 in Senate House Room G37.

Here’s a brief overview of the talk:

In the late mediaeval and early modern period, colour was anchored to minerals, animals and plants and semantically organised. Its status was contested between the Enlightenment and Romanticism in an argument over its physical or psychological nature that would meet an almost accidental resolution in 1931. That resolution was itself spurred by the commodification enabled by synthetic dyes derived from coal and later from oil. The history of practices associated with and affordances of inks, dyes and pigments, the substance of the visual, allows us access to histories of standardisation and commodification that reveal contemporary relations between human, technological and natural worlds.

And a bio:

Sean Cubitt is Professor of Film and Television at Goldsmiths, University of London. His books include Finite Media: Environmental Implications of Digital Technologies (forthcoming 2016); The Practice of Light: A Genealogy of Visual Technologies from Prints to Pixels (2014); Digital Aesthetics (2009); The Cinema Effect (2005); Simulation and Social Theory (2001); Videography: Video Media as Art and Culture (1993); and Timeshift: On Video Culture (1991). He has also edited or co-edited Ecomedia: Key Issues (2015); Digital Light (2015); Relive: Media Art Histories (2013); Rewind: Artists’ Video in Britain 1970s and 1980s (2012); The Ecocinema Reader: Theory and Practice (2012); Studying the Event Film: Lord of the Rings (2008); The Third Text Reader on Art, Culture and Theory (2002); and Aliens R Us: The Other in Science Fiction Cinema (2002). You can read more about his research interests here: http://www.gold.ac.uk/media-communications/staff/cubitt/

All are welcome. Further information about the seminar is available through the Institute of Historical Research (http://www.history.ac.uk/) and the Institute of English Studies (http://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/).

Media History Seminar with Laura Marcus

Please join us at the next Media History seminar for Laura Marcus’ presentation on ‘The Mediated Rhythms of the Modern’. We’ll be meeting at 6pm on Thursday February 18 in Senate House Room 104.

Laura Marcus is Goldsmiths’ Professor of English Literature and Fellow of New College at Oxford. Her book publications include Auto/biographical Discourses: Theory, Criticism, Practice (1994), Virginia Woolf: Writers and their Work (1997/2004), The Tenth Muse: Writing about Cinema in the Modernist Period (2007; awarded the 2008 James Russell Lowell Prize of the Modern Language Association), Dreams of Modernity: Psychoanalysis, Literature, Cinema (2014), and, as co-editor, The Cambridge History of Twentieth-Century English Literature (2004). You can read more about her research interests here: http://www.english.ox.ac.uk/about-faculty/faculty-members/permanent-post-holders/marcus-laura

All are welcome. Further information about the seminar is available through the Media History blog (https://mediahistoryseminar.wordpress.com/), the Institute of Historical Research (http://www.history.ac.uk/), and the Institute of English Studies (http://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/).

Media History Seminar on the ‘Editor-Function’

All are welcome at the next Media History seminar to hear Matthew Philpotts’ talk titled ‘So, what DO editors do? The Editor-Function and the German Literary World in 1930’. The seminar will take place on Thursday January 21 at 6pm in Senate House Room G37.

Here’s a brief overview of the presentation:

Taking as my starting-point Patten and Finkelstein’s wide-ranging discussion of the role of the Victorian periodical editor, in this seminar I shall explore the diverse realisations of the ‘editor-function’ in a synchronic corpus of ten German-speaking literary and intellectual journals from the year 1930. From the extreme ‘editorial singularity’ (Timms) of the performer-editor Karl Kraus in Die Fackel to the ideologically conditioned collective-editors of the Marxist revolutionary Die Linkskurve, from the established collector-editor Martin Bodmer in Corona to the young opportunist-editor Martin Raschke in Die Kolonne, I shall examine the relationship between the discursive attribution of editorship and the reality of editorial practice. Throughout, the emphasis will be not so much on the historically specific German case as on the typological and generic conclusions that can be drawn from it.

And a bio:

Matthew Philpotts is Senior Lecturer in German Studies at the University of Manchester. He co-authored the history of the East German literary magazine Sinn und Form (2009) and recently guest edited a special issue of Victorian Periodicals Review (Return to Theory, Fall 2015). He is currently completing a monograph on the role of the periodical editor in twentieth-century Europe. You can read more about him here: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/research/matthew.philpotts/personaldetails

Further information is available through the Institute of Historical Research (http://www.history.ac.uk/) and the Institute of English Studies (http://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/).

Media History Seminar on the BBC and Pre-War Television

Please join us at the next Media History seminar for Dr Jamie Medhurst’s talk ‘“A Very Tiresome Invention”: The BBC and Pre-War Television’. We’ll be meeting on Thursday December 3 at 6pm in Senate House Room 104. Full details can be found at: https://mediahistoryseminar.wordpress.com/

You can find out more about Dr Medhurst’s background and research interests at: http://www.aber.ac.uk/en/tfts/staff/jsm/

All are welcome. Further details about the seminar are available from the Institute of Historical Research and Institute of English Studies.