Ebooks & Book Launch

We’re pleased to announce a seminar and book launch for this year’s final Media History meeting. The seminar will start at 6pm on Tuesday May 16 in Senate House’s Chancellor’s Hall. The book launch will take place immediately afterwards (7 onwards – feel free to join us anytime).

First up: Simon Rowberry on ‘Resurrecting the Ebook: A media archaeological excavation of the Kindle’s development, 1930-2007.’

Amazon’s launch of the Kindle in 2007 was lauded as the moment when ebooks finally became economically viable for publishers. This success was facilitated by Amazon’s careful analysis of previous failed attempts to commercialize ebooks since the early 1990s, and earlier theoretical models developed since the 1930s. This presentation will explore how the Kindle’s reputation stems from a mixture of adapting pre-existing technology and the right social-technological context rather than a complete revolution in ebook design.

Simon Rowberry is Lecturer in Digital Media and Publishing at the University of Stirling. His research on ebooks and online reading habits has been published in Language and Literature, Convergence and Orbit: Writing Round Pynchon. Simon is currently working on a monograph exploring the development of the Kindle in its first decade.

The seminar will be followed by a book launch to celebrate the publication of Joanne Shattock’s Journalism and the Periodical Press in Nineteenth-Century Britain (Cambridge University Press, 2017).

Shattock

Newly commissioned essays by leading scholars offer a comprehensive and authoritative overview of the diversity, range and impact of the newspaper and periodical press in nineteenth-century Britain. Essays range from studies of periodical formats in the nineteenth century – reviews, magazines and newspapers – to accounts of individual journalists, many of them eminent writers of the day. The uneasy relationship between the new ‘profession’ of journalism and the evolving profession of authorship is investigated, as is the impact of technological innovations, such as the telegraph, the typewriter and new processes of illustration; and contributors go on to consider the transnational and global dimensions of the British press and its impact in the rest of the world. As digitisation of historical media opens up new avenues of research, the collection reveals the centrality of the press to our understanding of the nineteenth century.

The book will be introduced by Michael Slater, author of Charles Dickens (2009), Douglas Jerrold (2002) and editor of the Dent Uniform Edition of Dickens’ Journalism (1994-2000).

All welcome. Further information about the seminar is available through the Institute of Historical Research and the Institute of English Studies.

 

 

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